Regular expression validating url

These expressions are definitely very useful and come up time and time again in the tasks of any developer.I hope the descriptions of how they function are of use in deciphering the details of each of these two expressions.

Your user interface should take care of the formatting problem by having a clear documentation on the format and/or split the phone into parts (area, exchange, number) and/or have an entry mask.

The following expression is pretty lenient on the format and should accept 999-999-9999, 9999999999, (999) 999-9999.

Consult the regular expression documentation or the regular expression solutions to common problems section of this page for examples. You can create range of characters using the hyphen character such as A-Z (A to Z).

If you need more examples or solutions, please contact me. Note that in character sets, special characters (., *, ) do not have any special meaning. This means match anything that is a single white space character OR anything that is not a white space character!

This free regular expression tester lets you test your regular expressions against any entry of your choice and clearly highlights all matches.

It is Java Script based and uses XReg Exp library for enhanced features. It works well for fully qualified URL, but doesnt work if we use URL without http or https That is it validates: but not validates com what i need is that in addition to current behaviour, it validates the url not having http specifying, that is it should validate com too Thanks Friends Manish Sadhwani if your regex processor has trouble. It's not terribly strict, but it matches all standard domain names (but might let slip through some invalid ones). or, see this url This should work for most regex processors:/((? Followed by at least one or more valid domain characters (a-z, 0-9, or -)Matches without case sensitivity (/i)It does not enforce white space, so it will match this: blah and return you want to enforce space, add \s to the beginning, but then you have to ensure that you add a space to the beginning of the string to match. They can be replaced with matching groups () if your regex processor has trouble. It's not terribly strict, but it matches all standard domain names (but might let slip through some invalid ones). Bottom line for these two examples is that I like to use the example expressions found in an article on Net Tuts /and modify them to meet my needs.Since I’m mentioning the site, I definitely suggest browsing over to it if you are looking for further reading about regular expressions including sample code and reference material.The expression logically breaks address matches into four groups. It’s good to note that this expression is not case-sensitive and will match email addresses written in mixed case.

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