Radiometric dating activity answer key

Carbon-14 dating was not performed on the shroud until 1988, when the process had been refined to the point where only a small amount of material needed to be destroyed.Samples were tested at three independent laboratories, each being given four pieces of cloth, with only one unidentified piece from the shroud, to avoid prejudice.One of the most famous cases of carbon-14 dating involves the Shroud of Turin, a long piece of fabric purported to be the burial shroud of Jesus (see Figure 22.28).

Its remarkable negative imprint of an apparently crucified body resembles the then-accepted image of Jesus.

As a result, the relic has been remained controversial throughout the centuries.

The chance of heads is 50 percent, no matter what has happened before.

The probability concept aligns with the traditional definition of half-life.

In this activity, you will be able to combine your knowledge of relative dating methods (learned in Activity 7) with the absolute dating method to determine more accurately the geologic history of a region.

These schematic columnar sections contain the stratigraphic sequence for the Transvaal Basin in Africa and the Nabberu Basin and Hamersley Basin in Western Australia.Click to expand a text description Three color coded columns.Column 1 (Nabberu) from top down: crystalline basement rocks, basinal carbonates, Granular IF with smaller bands of argillite throughout and then quartz arenite.All three laboratories found samples of the shroud contain 92 percent of the Part of the Shroud of Turin, which shows a remarkable negative imprint likeness of Jesus complete with evidence of crucifixion wounds.The shroud first surfaced in the 14th century and was only recently carbon-14 dated.Here we will explore half-life and activity, the quantitative terms for lifetime and rate of decay. The answer can be found by examining Figure 22.27, which shows how the number of radioactive nuclei in a sample decreases with time.

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