Herb alpert the dating game Numbers for dirty chats

Alpert‘s family of sidemen and composers were busy generating their own catchy hits, like Wechter‘s deadly, infectious “Spanish Flea,” and the tragically short-lived Ervan Coleman‘s wonderfully goofy “Tijuana Taxi.” The bossman’s trumpet could be joyous, mocking, and melancholy in turns, and his choices of tunes totally unpredictable; who else would dare juxtapose “The 3rd Man Theme,” “Walk, Don’t Run,” “I’m Getting Sentimental Over You,” and “Zorba the Greek” on one record?

No other TJB record has as much unbuttoned fun and humor as this one — and not surprisingly, it spent six weeks at number one in 1966.

For instance, the mod sonic wrinkle in “Girl from Ipanema” emits a darkness veiled in mystery, directly contrasting the light buoyancy of “Hello!

herb alpert the dating game-65

Pisano, who debuted as a composer on Going Places, comes up with a memorably whistleable song, “So What’s New,” and the rest of Alpert‘s songwriting brigade (Ervan Coleman, Julius Wechter, and Sol Lake) chime in with some lively, catchy tunes.

There is also an assortment of pop, film, and Broadway standards of the day, all impeccably arranged by Alpert, whose production instincts grew sharper and surer with every release. (Standing Room Only), referring to the Tijuana Brass’ string of sold-out concerts, is an accurate title, for this LP is about a seven-piece band loaded with experienced jazzers who groove and swing together to a greater degree than on their previous albums.

Sol Lake — who provided Alpert “The Lonely Bull” and “Mexican Shuffle” returns, and this time he has custom-made the upbeat and, above all, catchy trio of “Green Peppers,” “Bittersweet Samba,” and “El Garbanzo.” Allen Toussaint‘s title composition “Whipped Cream” garnered significant attention, but not as a chart hit.

Rather, it could be heard as bachelorettes were being introduced on ABC-TV’s The Dating Game.

The ballads “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face,” “Angelito,” and “Adios, Mi Corazon” provide contrasts with Alpert‘s sensitive scores never seeming maudlin or unnecessarily over the top. Original Release Date: 1965 Re-issue Date: 2015 Building upon South of the Border‘s (1964) Top Ten success, Herb Alpert dismissed the contingency of Los Angeles-based studio instrumental all-stars, which he had christened the Tijuana Brass.

If the regal “El Presidente” sounds particularly familiar, it may well be due to Alpert‘s slight renovation of the “Winds of Barcelona” from the Tijuana Brass‘ previous effort, the less than impressive Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass, Vol. It was renamed “El Presidente,” presumably to honor the then-recent memory of the slain U. Because there was enough demand for live dates, just like a musical Gepetto, Alpert formed a real Tijuana Brass.

) is a cleverly structured, exciting and haunting piece of record-making — and its composer, Sol Lake, becomes the charter member of Alpert‘s team of TJB tunesmiths with several more ethnic-flavored numbers.

In accordance with the newly emerging bossa nova movement, Alpert does a nice, straightforward, authentic cover of “Desafinado,” even departing a bit from the tune with some spare jazz-inspired licks, and “Crawfish” pleasingly adapts the mariachi horn sound to a bossa beat.

The bandleader/trumpeter was joined by Tonni Kalash (trumpet), Robert Edmondson (trombone), Pat Senatore (bass), John Pisano (guitars), Lou Pagani (piano), and Nick Ceroli (drums).

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