Formula for validating dea number

I came up with this: Here's a perl script to test it. It should be compatible with international numbers and localization formats.

formula for validating dea number-37

In my opinion, the most elegant solution is to validate a minimum length, nothing more.

How are extensions (e.g., 111-222-3333 x 44444) going to be handled? Even if you could write a big, hairy validator that would allow all the different legitimate formats, it would end up allowing pretty much anything even remotely resembling a phone number in the first place.

You'll want to parse the first few digits to determine what the country code is, then act differently based on the country.

You'll have a hard time dealing with international numbers with a single/simple regex, see this post on the difficulties of international (and even north american) phone numbers.

My test script downloads a file from the internet and prints all the phone numbers in it. Maintaining a complex rule-set which could be outdated at any point in the future by any country in the world does not sound fun.

:\(\s*([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9])\s*\)|([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9]))\s*(? When you match,

:\(\s*([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9])\s*\)|([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9]))\s*(? When you match, $1 contains the area code, $2 and $3 contain the phone number, and $5 contains the extension. Do you foresee any need to allow square, curly, or angled brackets for some regions? If you want to maintain per digit rules (such as in US Area Codes and Prefixes (exchange codes) must fall in the range of 200-999) well, good luck to you.A card issuer identifier is an identifier for an entity that issues a health care identification card.If the NPI is used as a component of the card issuer identifier on a standard health care identification card, the NPI will be prefixed with the 5 digit identifier "80840". If you're talking about form validation, the regexp to validate correct meaning as well as correct data is going to be extremely complex because of varying country and provider standards. I interpret the question as looking for a broadly valid pattern, which may not be internally consistent - for example having a valid set of numbers, but not validating that the trunk-line, exchange, etc. North America is straightforward, and for international I prefer to use an 'idiomatic' pattern which covers the ways in which people specify and remember their numbers: The North American pattern makes sure that if one parenthesis is included both are. And while stripping all/most non-numeric characters may work well on the server side (especially if you are planning on passing these values to a dialer), you may not want to thrash the user's input during validation, particularly if you want them to make corrections in another field.In addition to its application in validating NPI numbers, it's also commonly used in validating credit card numbers and IMEI numbers.

||

:\(\s*([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9])\s*\)|([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9]))\s*(? When you match, $1 contains the area code, $2 and $3 contain the phone number, and $5 contains the extension. Do you foresee any need to allow square, curly, or angled brackets for some regions? If you want to maintain per digit rules (such as in US Area Codes and Prefixes (exchange codes) must fall in the range of 200-999) well, good luck to you.

A card issuer identifier is an identifier for an entity that issues a health care identification card.

If the NPI is used as a component of the card issuer identifier on a standard health care identification card, the NPI will be prefixed with the 5 digit identifier "80840".

If you're talking about form validation, the regexp to validate correct meaning as well as correct data is going to be extremely complex because of varying country and provider standards. I interpret the question as looking for a broadly valid pattern, which may not be internally consistent - for example having a valid set of numbers, but not validating that the trunk-line, exchange, etc. North America is straightforward, and for international I prefer to use an 'idiomatic' pattern which covers the ways in which people specify and remember their numbers: The North American pattern makes sure that if one parenthesis is included both are.

And while stripping all/most non-numeric characters may work well on the server side (especially if you are planning on passing these values to a dialer), you may not want to thrash the user's input during validation, particularly if you want them to make corrections in another field.

In addition to its application in validating NPI numbers, it's also commonly used in validating credit card numbers and IMEI numbers.

||

:\(\s*([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9])\s*\)|([2-9]1[02-9]|[2-9][02-8]1|[2-9][02-8][02-9]))\s*(? When you match, $1 contains the area code, $2 and $3 contain the phone number, and $5 contains the extension. Do you foresee any need to allow square, curly, or angled brackets for some regions? If you want to maintain per digit rules (such as in US Area Codes and Prefixes (exchange codes) must fall in the range of 200-999) well, good luck to you.

A card issuer identifier is an identifier for an entity that issues a health care identification card.

If the NPI is used as a component of the card issuer identifier on a standard health care identification card, the NPI will be prefixed with the 5 digit identifier "80840".

If you're talking about form validation, the regexp to validate correct meaning as well as correct data is going to be extremely complex because of varying country and provider standards. I interpret the question as looking for a broadly valid pattern, which may not be internally consistent - for example having a valid set of numbers, but not validating that the trunk-line, exchange, etc. North America is straightforward, and for international I prefer to use an 'idiomatic' pattern which covers the ways in which people specify and remember their numbers: The North American pattern makes sure that if one parenthesis is included both are.

contains the area code, and contain the phone number, and contains the extension. Do you foresee any need to allow square, curly, or angled brackets for some regions? If you want to maintain per digit rules (such as in US Area Codes and Prefixes (exchange codes) must fall in the range of 200-999) well, good luck to you.

A card issuer identifier is an identifier for an entity that issues a health care identification card.

If the NPI is used as a component of the card issuer identifier on a standard health care identification card, the NPI will be prefixed with the 5 digit identifier "80840".

If you're talking about form validation, the regexp to validate correct meaning as well as correct data is going to be extremely complex because of varying country and provider standards. I interpret the question as looking for a broadly valid pattern, which may not be internally consistent - for example having a valid set of numbers, but not validating that the trunk-line, exchange, etc. North America is straightforward, and for international I prefer to use an 'idiomatic' pattern which covers the ways in which people specify and remember their numbers: The North American pattern makes sure that if one parenthesis is included both are.

And while stripping all/most non-numeric characters may work well on the server side (especially if you are planning on passing these values to a dialer), you may not want to thrash the user's input during validation, particularly if you want them to make corrections in another field.

In addition to its application in validating NPI numbers, it's also commonly used in validating credit card numbers and IMEI numbers.

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