Dating service based on intelligence test

It might behoove us all to keep an open mind; you never know what you could be missing if you don’t allow yourself to experience it in the first place.Online dating sites promise to use science to match you with the love of your life.

Although these online dating sites attract millions of customers and billions of dollars, scientific study reveals that they cannot possibly come through on these promises.

In a recent comprehensive analysis, Northwestern University psychologist Eli Finkel and collaborators claim that online dating sites not only don’t improve, but may even hurt those seeking happiness in their relationships.

Many of them even go beyond the matching process to help you confront the complex world of finding (and keeping) partners.

e Harmony provides its users with advice on dating, relationships, and—of course—plenty of diagnostic quizzes.

We are busier than ever at work, our jobs require that we either travel or move to new cities, and as a result, we don’t have the luxury to rely on finding a partner through connections with family or friends.

Online dating sites help fill the gap that our busy lives have created in our search for connection.

Because you’re not meeting actual people, but instead examining their profiles, you’re not going through the normal give-and-take that occurs when people meet and talk for the first time.

The decision-making processes we go through when we’re examining online profiles are also different than those we use in offline situations.

It was natural enough that online dating services would develop and evolve over the past two decades.

The growth of social media encourages internet-based connections with the people we know and love and the people we would like to get to know and love.

when you’re talking about physical traits and not existential philosophy, I’m not going to get the vibe.”I would like to take this moment to point out that being an athlete or liking sports is not mutually exclusive from intellectual curiosity. Filing everyone you meet down to just one descriptive category is reductive at best, and pretty damaging at worst—both for the person you’re judging, and for yourself.

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